Reading The Laughing Corpse by Laurell K. Hamilton

I don’t do a lot of traditional book reviews and this isn’t going to be one of them, I guess, more like thoughts on the book while explaining why I think it’s so great. Maybe that is a traditional review. Whatever. It’s morning and I’m not awake yet.

So I’m re-reading the ENTIRE Anita Blake Vampire Hunter Series from book one to infinity because I last stopped reading the series at book 13 (or something, can’t remember) and got into other things and then Laurell K. Hamilton’s Merry Gentry series.

By the time I wanted to pick the Anita books up again I’d forgotten half of what happened and knew I needed to start from the very beginning to get the full immersive experience.

I picked up Guilty Pleasures back in January and I was going to try to finish all of them by the end of this year. Seeing as it’s already August and I’ve just started book 4, I probably won’t.

But I wanted to talk about what I’ve read so far, specifically in the context of how art imitates life and how I connected with the second book in the Anita Blake series, The Laughing Corpse.

Trigger warning: Don’t read below the cut if you don’t want spoilers or expositions on violence, gore, and rape in literature.

Continue reading Reading The Laughing Corpse by Laurell K. Hamilton

A-Bomb Anniversary

“On August 6 in 1945, the a-bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. I was a fourteen year old student. But I didn’t go to school. Instead. I worked in a factory.”

So writes Yasuhiko Shigemoto at the end of his second haiku collection, commemorating the bombing of Hiroshima 74 years ago.

The poems within are devastating, haunting, and viscerally beautiful.

This is why poetry exists.

Don’t forget.

*

A-Bomb Dome photo credit

Things I Read Dec.-Nov. 2018ish Through July 2019

This is documentation and record keeping.

This is a third attempt at archival work.

In no particular order.

Books. Novellas. Short Stories. Scholarly Articles.

The Beasts Who Fought for Fairyland Until the Very End and Further Still: Catherynne M. Valente

Wounded: Laurell K. Hamilton

Guilty Pleasures: Laurell K. Hamilton

The Laughing Corpse: Laurell K. Hamilton

Circus of the Damned: Laurell K. Hamilton

Beauty: Laurell K. Hamilton

Shut Down: Laurell K. Hamilton

Goblin Slayer vols. 1-3: Kumo Kagyu

Daughter of the Blood: Anne Bishop

Battle Angel Alita vols. 5-9: Yukito Kishiro

Battle Angel Alita Mars Chronicle vols. 1-2: Yukito Kishiro

Too Wyrd, Runespells #1: Sarah Buhrman

Magpie: A Collection of Really Short Stories: Carrie Mumford

Pisces-Silver Blood Collection: D.N. Leo

Binti: Nnedi Okorafor

Binti: Home: Nnedi Okorafor

Binti: The Night Masquerade: Nnedi Okorafor

Claymore vols. 1-4: Norihiro Yagi

The Long Walk: Stephen King as Richard Bachman

The Name of the Wind: Patrick Rothfuss

The Wise Man’s Fear: Patrick Rothfuss

Lists I Left for My Sister: Rosamund Hodge

A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson: H.P. Lovecraft

Polaris: H. P. Lovecraft

The Beast in the Cave: H.P. Lovecraft

The Alchemist: H.P. Lovecraft

The Tomb: H.P. Lovecraft

Dagon: H.P. Lovecraft

Ghost Sniper: David Healy

Hot Head: Damon Suede

Mission: Protect the Ex: Alina Popescu

Strength to Let Go: Tales of the Werewolf Tribes Book One: Alina Popescu

Penal Units in the Red Army: Alex Statiev: Europe-Asia Studies vol. 62 no. 5 (July 2010)

Love in the Time of Global Warming: Francesca Lia Block

The Collector: Titainborn Universe Book Zero: Rhett Bruno

Parable of the Sower: Octavia Butler

The Big Flash: Norman Spinrad

The Cruel Prince: Holly Black

The Lost Sisters: Holly Black

The Wicked King: Holly Black

Red Queen: Victoria Aveyard

Giovanni’s Room: James Baldwin

Relic of the Mad Poet: A Journey to the Tree Of Sorrows Story: E. H. Robinson

Berserk vols. 1-2: Kentaro Miura

Of Children, and Houses, and Hope: Aliette De Bodard

In Morningstar’s Shadow: Aliette De Bodard

A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms: George R. R. Martin

Every River Runs to Salt: Rachel K. Jones

The Second Wish: Brian Lumley

The Sun, the Sea, and the Silent Scream: Brian Lumley

Favorites

Favorite Book: Parable of the Sower, Octavia Butler

Favorite Novella: Every River Runs to Salt, Rachel K. Jones

Favorite Short Story: Lists I Left for My Sister, Rosamund Hodge

Miscellaneous Comments

I enjoyed A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms and Love in the Time of Global Warming more than I thought I would. I was reminded a lot of Block’s Primavera and thought the writing was much more vivid than in Necklace Of Kisses and Elementals.

I was disappointed with Holly Black’s new Folk of the Air Series. The “bad boy” really isn’t that bad and the heroine falls a bit flat compared to the characters in Tithe, Valiant, and The Darkest Part of the Forest. I don’t know if I’ve just *gasp* grown up a little bit or she intentionally wrote those characters to be less complex (than those in her other series) and more obvious caricatures of tropes for wider accessibility/a specific type of audience. However, I will read all the books because I am invested in all her work and am immensely grateful for her efforts in reviving the Bordertown stories. And the Zombies vs. Unicorns anthology she co-edited with Justine Larbalestier is amazing. Don’t judge me for not making it through the Spiderwick Chronicles yet. I’ll get there eventually.

My godfather gave me his copy of Every River Runs to Salt and I am so glad he did. It will probably have a permanent home in my Re-Read Pile.

I feel like I’ve stepped too far away from poetry this year, writing and reading it. I’ve neglected the work and writers that bouyed me up in grad school. This is bad because poetry is the life blood. I am a salt covered slug without it. I will make an attempt to spend the rest of the year injecting more poetry into my life.

Disclaimers and Trigger Warnings

So I haven’t played Vampire the Masquerade, or VTM as the kids might still call it, in a long time. Last month when Mr. J came to visit me he picked up a copy of V5, the newest edition of the core rule book. His d&d group wants to try it. I was about to read the rule book myself and see how much things changed from the old days and I was really struck by the Mature Content Warning on the first page.

The V5 core rulebook has probably the most awesome, compassionate, patient, tolerant Mature Content Warning I have ever seen and I would love to take it as my own but that would be plagiarism.

My favorite part of this has to be “Including a problematic subject in a Storytelling game is not the same as glorifying it, if you take the chance to explore it critically, it can be the exact opposite.”

As a horror writer, this sentiment is very important to me and I’m so glad I finally found something that expresses my feelings so clearly and professionally. Even if they thought it was okay to put a Malkavian in yellow leggings. That I don’t think I’m okay with. But whatever. The times they are a changing.

“If we understand the problems facing us, we are better armed to fight them.”

Quotes and Excerpt from Vampire: the Masquerade V5, written by Kenneth Hite, Martin Ericsson, Matthew Dawkins, Karim Muammar, and Juhana Pettersson, produced by Jason Carl, published by White Wolf Entertainment, 2018.

How I got into Stephen King

I don’t like all Stephen King books but I can’t deny he is a master of the horror genre. And the books of his that I do like, I like because they entertain me as a reader, not a writer. I get transported into that world and I don’t want to leave because there’s something there in the terror that feels like home.

So when I was a kid, my mom went to Pennsylvania for a conference or something and first I got scared because I didn’t hear Pennsylvania, I heard Transylvania and I thought Dracula was going to kill her. I was corrected rather quickly about that before I could realize that if Dracula “killed” her she could turn into a vampire and have a pretty cool life after that.

But then after we dropped her off at the airport my dad said something about how her plane might crash, a possibility that had never popped into my head before even though I had my first plane ride when I was 3, and when we got home he put on The Langoliers.

And I fucking loved it.

I loved the creepy abandoned airport, I love how the characters could pick through other people’s stuff and explore things that seemed ordinary but were really out of the ordinary.

I loved the little girl, I wanted to be her. I loved the tough Australian guy, I wanted to marry him and I was sad when he died. I loved the pilot and his bravery flying the plane through the rip in reality knowing that if he fucked it up they would all die. I even liked the guy who ripped up paper, even though he was also kinda creepy. And I felt kinda bad that he was messed up. But I also loved it when the Langoliers ate him.

I could go on and on about those characters. I think it’s one of the few stories where I like every single character, which doesn’t happen often.

I hot-glued cotton balls to a rock and drew teeth on it. I am not artistic. It was an albino langolier. Whatever.

I thought those monsters were fucking adorable. And if you think about it, knowing that a toothy, round monster thing eats the past is kind of comforting because everything embarrassing or humiliating that ever happened to you is, technically, gone now.

And that’s how I got into Stephen King.